‘What does it mean to be a writer? It means you try to represent what it is to be alive.’
FT, Small Talk
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— Arifa Akbar, One Minute with

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‘The author chooses five of the best memoirs by other writers.’
— The Telegraph, My Best Memoirs
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‘The Stasiland writer on her latest book, ALL THAT I AM and the extraodinary history of German socialist exiles in wartime Britain.’
— Jonathan Derbyshire, The New Statesman
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‘We sit at her kitchen table and she tells me about her new book, ALL THAT I AM, which returns to Germany but to an earlier time. It is set in the long lead-up to World War II, when the world approved of Hitler but people such as her heroines, Ruth Becker and Dora Fabian, saw with horrified clarity what he intended to do. They were like swimmers caught in a rip, arms waving furiously as people looked the other way.’
— Catherine Kennan, Sydney Morning Herald
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‘In spring 1935, two women were found dead in an attic flat in Bloomsbury. Both were German refugees, among the first to flee from Hitler, active in the fledgling resistance movement. A coroner recorded two verdicts of suicide, but many suspect foul play. The file relating to their deaths has now been lost. That’s a gem of a starting point for a novelist, but Anna Funder didn’t begin here.’
The Scotsman
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‘People assume that with fiction, you stretch credulity to its limits. In my experience the reverse is true: you are constantly reining it in to maintain credibility. With Stasiland I didn’t want to rein in the facts, I wanted to explore them. This novel is aiming at something completely different. This is about representing consciousness from the inside; it’s about being inside Ruth’s and Toller’s heads.’
— David Mattin, The National
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‘Based on the real life experiences of Funder’s friend Ruth Blatt, the novel, Funder explains in the afterword, is what she has “made” of Ruth and her friends’ stories: “It is reconstructed from fossil fragments, much as you might draw skin and feathers over an assembly of dinosaur bones, to fully see the beast”.’
— Lucy Scholes, Untitled Books
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‘Anna Funder is an internationally acclaimed bestselling Australian author whose debut Stasiland recounted the personal stories of people who worked for the East German secret police, and those whose lives were affected and even destroyed by their covert activities.’
— Boris Kelly, Overland
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‘The idea of choosing not to witness – and the moral responsibilities that carries – is central to the book. There are characters who don’t see things they don’t want to know about those closest to them.’
— Interview by Jo Case, Readings
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‘It is one of those early autumn days when the sun is low in the sky, sending long shadows across the street to where Anna Funder, the winner of the 2004 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction now turned novelist, is standing staring up at the top windows of a well-appointed, four-storied Georgian town house. We are in Bloomsbury and I am talking about property prices.’
— Toby Clements, The Telegraph, A Page in the Life
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‘So it was clear to me from the age of 6 that language is a magic curtain, and that you can express yourself differently depending on which language you use. I was mad about words from then.’
— John Purcell, Booktopia, Ten Terrifying Questions
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‘Anna Funder was in India for the Hay Festival in Kerala.’
The Times of India
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‘The émigré world has its secret agents and double-dealers, giving “All That I Am,” at times, the suspense and dread of a literary thriller. But most of all, it is a group portrait of exile and angst at a time of world-historical dislocation.’
— Tom Nolan, Wall Street Journal, In Brief
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